Evolution of a Poem

For this week, I thought it might be interesting to look at the changes a poem can go through. This is the original handwritten version and then the typed version. My writer’s group gave me some suggestions as well, then it appeared on my page last Friday in its current form.

Advertisements

Poem: Streaming Memories

Here is the Friday poem, please feel free to share.

StreamingMemories

Of Time and Memory

Oneonta
“What was and is, always will be,
but what about what will be?
Is it happening concurrently?
Have I slipped this time stream unaware?”
 
From the poem, “Time, Free Will, and our Monomyth,”
in my book, “A Sanctuary Built of Words.”
 
I’ve been fascinated by the interplay of time and memory for as long as I can recall. It started, perhaps, with the Science Fiction and Fantasy reading I did in middle school. From the book “A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeleine L’Engle to the more recent, brilliant movie, “Arrival,” based on a Nebula awarding winning story by Ted Chiang, I have been inspired by the stories people have written related to these concepts.
 
I know smells and musical rhythms can be powerful aids in recalling memories but can a simple change in elevation or even the rhythm of driving around mountains work the same way? Perhaps. It seemed to me that as we drove into the Catskills this past weekend, it began to “feel” more like home.
 
It felt a little like I was experiencing a tesseract, Madeleine L’Engle’s concept for a wrinkle in the space-time continuum. Like I was peering through a door in the hills, back toward my childhood. It turned into a poem, of course, which I plan to post on Friday.

Poem: Suspended Sentence (Reprised)

Sometimes the right words just won’t come out, we just don’t know what to say. As always, feel free to share.

Suspended Sentence

Poem: Holding Space (reprised)

I wrote this poem for a friend a couple of years ago when he was going through a tough time but it seems like a number of friends could use it these days. Please feel free to share it with your friends.

HoldingSpace

Poem: What else is time for?

The Friday poem.

BefuddlingConundrum

Novel Word Count?

How long does a novel have to be? That has been widely debated and seems to change from time to time. The bottom limit has often been regarded as around 50,000 words but I just finished Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and was much surprised to find that it weighs in at only 46,118 words. I feel much better about the two novels I’ve drafted which came in at around 53,000 and 63,000 words. Onward and upward!

fahrenheit-451-cover

Poem: A Golden Glow

GoldenGlow

Editing Mode

Every writer needs an extra cup, or two, of their preferred beverage when editing. Am I right? Well, here’s a little trick that I’ve recently found helpful.
 
I write either on paper or on a computer. If I write on paper, then I edit for the first time as I type my manuscript into the computer.
 
If I write on the computer, I may make one or two passes reading through the manuscript and editing on the computer. Then I print it.
 
I edit it on the paper copy and transfer the changes to computer document.
 
Now I’ve added a new method for finding my mistakes and taking stock of the landscape of the draft. I turn it into a .pdf file and load it to my Kindle, where I have a free .pdf file reader.
 
Something about reading on the Kindle, the way I might another book, helps me to catch even more mistakes and edit the overall plot and flow of the story. It’s almost as if I were reading someone else’s writing.
 
I might try a suggestion from author G.H. Monroe, and read it into a recorder so I can play it back for myself.
 
Pretty soon it’ll be the beta readers turn! Yay!
42090738_547949398982782_4993755116394774528_n

Poem: Eventide Rhapsody

The Friday poem. Please feel free to share.

EventideRhapsody

« Older entries